Portable Planer Thicknesser Reviews: Which is the best?

 

So you are looking for a planer thicknesser. More likely than not you already know what it is, how it works and what you want it for, but for the less woodworking-savvy out there, it can be a little confusing when trying to decide the best planer thicknesser to get. That’s where we come in, hopefully, with our planer thicknesser reviews, we will lay things out in front of you and make things just that little bit clearer, so that your decision on which one to purchase will be just that little bit easier!

What is a Planer Thicknesser?

So what is a planer thicknesser and how does it compare to a planer, a thicknesser, a thickness planer, a jointer, a bench-top planer, a planer-jointer combo, or a jointer planer? Some of these names refer to the same thing with some of them used more in the United States while others are more often used in the UK. This can make things quite confusing to the woodworking newcomer. To help you get a grip on what’s what, the following table should help clarify differences.

 

Confused by the Names?

 
United Kingdom
United States
triton-tpt125
"Thicknesser"
"Thickness Planer"

"Planer"
silverline-344944
"Jointer Planer"

"Planer"
"Jointer"
draper-09543
"Planer Thicknesser"
"Planer/Jointer combo"

 

Essentially, there are 3 types of machine in this woodworking category, Fortunately, they are most easily differentiated simply by their look:

  1. The Thicknesser – The thicknesser is also called a planer or a thickness planer in the US. It is easily identifiable by its ‘box’-like square-ish appearance with the cutting mechanism doing its business on the top face of the workpiece. The thicknesser is used to create a level surface on uneven or old wood stock but it is not designed to ‘straighten’ out any bowing or cupping curvature that might be inherent in stretches of wood.
  2. The Jointer Planer – The second type of machine is the jointer planer which is also known more simply as a jointer. This jointer is easy to identify by the large surface and exposed cutting blades on the top of the machine (assuming the blade guard is pushed to one side). Stretches of wood are then passed over the cutting blades to level the wood from below. The jointer planer also incorporates a fence which allows the operator to create right-angled adjacent faces on the workpiece.
  3. The Planer Thicknesser – Finally, we have the planer thicknesser (also called the planer-jointer combo (US mostly)). This is simply a machine that incorporates both of the two previous machine types, a jointer planer on the upper surface and a thicknesser underneath.

 

What do you use a Planer Thicknesser for?

So the planer thicknesser is essentially 2 machines in one, each with a different primary function. The jointer planer or jointer on the upper surface of the machine is used to ‘straighten’ out any bowing, cupping or twisting that might be present in wood stock. To do this, 2 adjacent longitudinal sides of a piece of wood are passed over the jointer sequentially, while using the integrated fence as a guide to create an exact 90 degree angle between them. This is better understood with a demonstration.

Once the 2 adjacent sides of the workpiece are perpendicular to each other, the 2 remaining longitudinal sides are then levelled off using the thicknesser part of the machine. To do this, the perpendicular sides just created are used as a ‘guide’ for the thicknesser to make each opposite side parallel. The end result is an exact rectangular cross-sectional profile along the length of the wood stock.

 

So how to decide on the best Planer Thicknesser to go for?

Well that all depends on what your budget is. In general, as with any other power tool, the more money one is willing to spend on a planer thicknesser, the better the quality and design of the machine. Since this is a website more for the do-it-yourself-er, only the models that won’t break the average DIY-er’s bank account are considered below. Most of these models of planer thicknesser are quite small in size and are even small enough to be can be considered somewhat portable. However portability here really means that they can be quite easily moved around the workshop or garage without too much fuss, but are not really designed for easily lugging around to friends and relatives when they are in need of your DIY-ing abilities. As with almost any other power tool, looking under the hood at the technical specifications of different brands can go some way towards helping make the final decision on which one to choose.

Features to look out for on a Planer Thicknesser

  • Planing width: this refers to the width of the wood stock passing through the planer or through the thicknesser. This is a critical parameter, so knowing the largest size of material widths you will likely be working with is preferred so that you don’t end up being held back by too small a machine. In general, the planing width is the same for both the jointer part of the planer thicknesser as well as for its thicknesser facility.
  • Thicknessing capacity: As with the planing width, knowing the maximum thickness of material that you are likely to be working with is crucial so that a thicknesser capable of accepting the wood of that size can be selected. Obviously, the thicknesser can only allow the passage of a workpiece up to a certain thickness otherwise it will simply not be able to fit inside the opening of the machine.
  • Planing depth: Planing depth refers to the amount of material that is removed from the workpiece as it passes through the machine. This is likely to be a less important characteristic to determine your choice of machine unless speed and efficiency is of paramount importance to your woodworking operation. This is because workpieces can simply be passed through the machine more times to get the desired cutting depth required. In addition, the job of the planer thicknesser is primarily to make workpieces true and/or clean up and level the surface of wood, so making very deep cuts is usually unnecessary.
  • Fence: The fence is essential to the jointer planer as it is required to make the sides of a workpiece perpendicular. Some fences have the ability to tilt which can provide an easy way to bevel the edge of workpiece, although if this comes at the cost of the sturdiness of the fence in its fully upright position, then it’s not worth it. A sturdy 90 degree fence should always be prioritised.
  • Power: The input power of the unit in Watts gives some idea of the versatility of the machine, with more power usually meaning that it is able to cut deeper on wider pieces of wood stock. These days most machines of a particular category all have similar power and cutting depth capabilities. In the case of the ‘portable’ planer thicknesser, this tends to be around the 1500W mark.
  • Brand: As with any other power tool, the big brand names are usually more sturdy, reliable and more accurate. Unfortunately, this usually means that they come with a heftier price tag.

 

‘Portable’ Planer Thicknessers

These planer thicknessers are described as ‘portable’ not because they are designed to be carried around from workspace to workspace, but because they are small compared to their more professional brethren, and they can more easily be moved around the workspace. This can be useful in a small workshop or garage where space is at a premium and the machine might need to be stowed away until it is actually needed.

As you will see in the reviews below, one overriding characteristic of the majority of portable planer thicknessers on the UK market today is that many of the machines are made up from identical components, and in a lot of cases, the machines actually look identical with the exception of their colour scheme and branding. However under the hood, things can be a little different.

 
Power
(Watts)
Approx. Weight
(kg)
Planing Width
(mm)
Planing Depth max.
(mm)
Thicknessing max.
(mm)
Power
(Watts)
Approx. Weight
(kg)
Planing Width
(mm)
Planing Depth max.
(mm)
Thicknessing max.
(mm)
Clarke CPT600
1250
22
152
2
120
Charnwood W588
1500
28
200
2-3
125
Draper 09543
1500
28
204
2-3
120
Scheppach HT850
1250
27
204
2
120
Clarke CPT800
1250
25
204
2
120
Fox F22-564/250
1500
20
254
2
120
Record PT260
machinemartbutton
1800
80
260
3
150

 

 


 

Planer Thicknesser Reviews:

 

The Clarke Planer Thicknessers CPT600 and CPT800

Image of the Clarke Planer Thicknesser, the CPT600

CPT600

The Clarke planer thicknessers, CPT600 and CPT800, are almost identical machines save for their dimensions. The CPT800 is able to cut a slightly wider board and, as a result, it is also slightly heavier than its smaller sibling. The Clarke planer thicknessers are good hobby-level machines that are designed for the DIY-er, although a professional woodworker might get away with using them as long as they are not overworked. They are compact machines that take up very little space in the home workshop or garage where space is invariably in short supply. As with other portable planer thicknessers, they are light enough to be moved around the workspace as needed, with the smaller of the Clarke machines weighing in at only 22kg. The fence on the upper jointer planer is probably the only disappointment with what otherwise are decent hobby machines. The fence is inconvenient to take off (to use the thicknesser) and put back on again, and it is also a bit flimsy. In addition, as with all the portable machines discussed here, the fence can not be moved laterally, so one has to watch out for excessive wear on the cutter closest to it since this area will naturally see the most work. Overall, taking into account a reasonable build quality and the price, these machines end up being a good deal.

Image of the Clarke Planer Thicknesser, the CPT800

CPT800

As for Clarke the company, Clarke International is a UK business marketing a wide range of tools and equipment to the British consumer. Although Clarke itself does not deal directly with consumer purchasing, it does get involved with the after-sales servicing and spare part needs of consumers. The sale of Clarke power products to the consumer is facilitated through a number of distributors. Clarke has been around since 1969 and although it started off as a manufacturer, it now sources its products from abroad. Quality is checked thoroughly though to uphold the Clarke brand’s reputation, through both in-house scrutiny and via external organisations. In addition, consumers can also contact the company for any after-sales service support via a dedicated section of the company. Consequently, Clarke products are generally regarded as value for money and buyers of Clarke equipment are generally very satisfied with their purchases.

 

 


The Charnwood Planer Thicknesser W588

Image of the Charnwood Planer Thicknesser, the W588Like the Clarke machines discussed above, the Charnwood W588 is another of the ‘generic’ planer thicknessers, with many of the parts of the machine identical to other ‘competitor’ products. The W588’s construction strongly resembles that of the Draper 09543 and the Fox F22-564/250 (reviewed below) with the obvious exception of colour and branding. Clearly, most of the parts for these machines are sourced from the same suppliers. The W588 is quite noisy, and the machine needs a little bit of fiddling to get things working accurately.  Unlike other ‘generic’ planer thicknessers, Charnwood has opted for a sturdier fence to improve the accuracy of the jointer. This fence can also be tilted up to 45 degrees from the vertical to allow the operator to make bevelled cuts.

Charnwood is a family-run business that has been around since the 1970s and focuses on providing woodworking machinery for both DIY-ers and professional users. They are located in Leicester and as you might expect from a small family-owned business, the company prides itself on offering quality products and after-sales technical support to customers. In addition, they are easily accessible if a replacement part is needed for the machine at a later date. Although in the past, Charnwood was more deeply involved in the actual manufacture of the equipment they sell, in more recent years, the company has switched to procuring products from the Far East to remain competitive. But fear not, the company has kept a watchful eye over the quality of the products that they sell to ensure that their reputation remains unblemished. So, although the W588 clearly has a lot of generic parts, one can rest assured that the machine has been sufficiently vetted to make sure that it is fit-for-purpose.

 

 


The Draper Planer Thicknesser BPT200 (09543)

Image of the Draper Planer Thicknesser, the BPT200Draper is a well known brand amongst many-a-UK DIY-er, selling both hand tools and power tools to the general British consumer. In general, the Draper brand is a trusted brand, and most of the time their tools are of decent quality. In the case of the Draper Planer Thicknesser BPT200, Draper has cut a few corners, presumably to remain competitive within the budget planer thicknesser space. The machine is clearly sourced once again from many of the same suppliers as the Fox F22-564/250 and the Charnwood W588, as the machines look almost identical especially from the outside (other than for their branding). As with the other machines, the majority of the Draper BPT200 is robustly built however, like other machines, some of parts, like the fence and the blade guard are a bit on the flimsy side. As with other budget planer thicknessers, the Draper BPT200 is very loud, so ear plugs or ear defenders are required for any extended cutting. In addition, a vacuum system is a must if you don’t want the wood clippings from clogging up the machine and wearing out the rollers with each job. In general, a reasonable machine for the price, and OK for the irregular use of a DIY-er, but unlikely to stand up to the heavy use of a professional.

 

 


The Scheppach Planer Thicknesser HT850 (HMS850)

Image of the Scheppach Planer Thicknesser, the HT850The Scheppach HT850 (also sometimes referred to as the HMS850) is once again one of the machines that has been manufactured in the Far East using many of the same suppliers that have been involved in the making of it’s competitor machines. Picture of the Scheppach company buildingIn fact, if you look at the HT850, it looks very much like the Clarke CPT800 construction-wise. Indeed, its technical specifications mirror closely those of the Clarke CPT800. As with the Clarke machines, the HT850 is a solidly built machine but suffers from the same issue of  some of its parts being a touch flimsy. Otherwise, as one would expect from a German company, the machine works well and is very sturdy. The Scheppach company is a medium-sized German company that has been around since 1927. For a long time, the company specialised in providing consumers with purely woodworking machinery, but in recent years, as the company has grown, it has diversified into other tools for both the amateur DIY enthusiast as well as trade professionals, and in the last couple of years has started to delve into selling equipment for the home garden market.

 

 


The Fox Planer Thicknesser F22-564/250

Image of the Fox Planer Thicknesser, the F22-564/250The Fox F22-564/250 planer thicknesser yet again falls into the generic East Asian model category that the majority of these budget planer thicknessers fit into. The Fox F22-564/250 is particularly similar to the Charnwood W588 and the Draper BPT200 (reviewed above).  Like its competitors, the Fox F22-564/250 is a reasonable machine for the DIY-er and possibly the trade professional who is willing to spend some time making some tweaks to the machine to improve its functioning. For instance, take Bill Warmisham, who had to spend some time adjusting the machine to fully eliminate snipe from the thicknesser when he first got it. Compared to most of its direct competitors, the Fox F22-564/250 has a wider planing width capacity of 254mm. In addition, it comes with its own stand, so there is no need to clear a space on the workshop table if you don’t want to. As with the Charnwood W588 the fence is of better quality than seen on some of its other competitors, and also tilts up to 45 degrees from the vertical for bevelled cuts if so desired.

The Fox brand is an Italian one owned by Femi, which is an Italian company that specialises in providing power tools for both the wood-working and metal-working do-it-yourselfers and as well as trade professionals.

 

 

 


The Record Planer Thicknesser PT260

Image of the Record Planer Thicknesser, the PT260Button to go to Machine MartThe Record Planer thicknesser PT260 falls into the ‘portable’ machine category even though it weighs a hefty 80kg. This is because it is a relatively small machine fitted with a leg stand and Button to go to Screwfixpedal-operated wheel-kit that allow it to be rolled around the workspace relatively easily. The PT260 is a sturdy machine that is accurate and reliable, and unlike most other ‘portable’ planer thicknessers, the thicknessing bed is made of cast iron which is part of the reason why the machine is so heavy. However, some of the heftier weight also comes from a more powerful motor drawing 1.8kW of power allowing it to cut deeper into workpieces than its budget competitors. The PT260 thicknesser can also accept a thicker block of wood than the other planer thicknessers in its category making the machine yet more versatile. The less-than-clear operating instructions are probably the only let down with the PT260, but then again, the machine is designed for the expert user who probably would not pay much attention to the manual anyway. The PT260 is a robust machine and this is backed up with a 5-year guarantee, illustrating the level of confidence that company has in its longevity. Unfortunately higher quality means a higher price tag and the PT260 is not cheap, coming in at more than double the price of the budget machines. However, on the plus side, at least it is not going to need replacing any time soon.

Picture of the distribution centre for the Record Power companyRecord Power, the company behind the PT260, is a UK-based company with a reputation for high quality hand and power tools. It is focused primarily on the expert DIY-er and the trade professional. The company also owns the Startrite brand, which covers a line of power tools that is specifically designed for industry.  Like other competitor companies, Record procures tools manufactured in the Far East, but is also involved in some manufacturing in the UK. Unlike some of the companies in this sector, Record power does sell directly to the consumer from their website and their products are also available from a number of distributors.

 

 



Further Information: Improving on the Budget Design

Since most of the portable planer thicknessers are in the budget category, and use many of the same structural components, it is not surprising that many of them suffer from the same inadequacies. But all is not lost if you don’t have the cash to drop on a more expensive machine. If you are handy with a tool or two, then you might want to have a go at tweaking the machine as Cosmas and Marius Hornberger have done in the videos below:

 Posted by at 6:56 pm